Details, McAvoy & Fassbender

(via buddiexnei)

highonawindyhill asked: Thank you thank you thank yoouuuuuuu!!!!!!!!!!!! Matt's fans are hugely freaking out right now. Many of us have been hoping for Matt Out cover for awhile -- and we've been hoping/expecting/dreaming/praying for it ever since the role in TNH was announced. Can't wait for more gorgeous pics! Damn!!! And adorable outtakes, yay. <3 Will there be a BTS video like there often is?? And I am hoping that we will get even a little bit from him about his family / personal life. <3 <3

shananaomi:

Thanks for all the !!!!!!!!

We at OUT have definitely been hoping to get Matt on the cover for a long time, too, and I’m really thrilled this worked out.

I just checked w/ the editors - no BTS video this time unfortunately because the location for the shoot wasn’t really big enough to accommodate additional cameras. 

There will definitely be more from him about growing up, his family and The Normal Heart to look forward to from Matt, plus truly gorgeous photos & cover. 

shananaomi:

turnabout:

Matt Bomer and Mark Ruffalo in Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart

It’s all fun and games until you’re ugly sobbing at the back of the theater in front of a bunch of twinks.

It’s great, btw. Beautifully adapted and restrained in ways I’d never have expected, and perfectly, so perfectly played.

And I’ve somehow been convinced it will be especially great for twinks and kids and Tumblr and the Glee generation, or anyone who’s never seen or known the play or much of anything about the early AIDS epidemic. I hope that theory bears out. It’s only one small part of the story but it’s an important one.

shananaomi:

Meet OUT’s June/July cover boy. You may also know him as Matt Bomer. You may now attempt to go about your Monday like nothing interesting has happened, but you will be so, so wrong. 
Here’s an excerpt from my cover story:

Bomer, whom Murphy had cast in guest roles on Glee (he played Darren Criss’s older brother) and The New Normal (as Andrew Rannells’s ostentatious ex-boyfriend), campaigned aggressively to play Felix. “Matt, out of everybody, fought the hardest for it,” Murphy tells Out. “It was that same passion that I had used to persuade Larry Kramer to give me the rights to the play.”
Murphy told Kramer they’d found their Felix. “I said, ‘I really believe in Matt Bomer.’ And Larry said, ‘But he’s so beautiful! Is he too beautiful?’”
Murphy arranged a meeting between the two men. “I was pretty starstruck,” Bomer says. “It was like meeting one of the Beatles. He was so central to my understanding and development. We talked for a really long time.” Kramer emailed Murphy immediately after: “He’s the one.”
Because Bomer knew the part would require a production break during which he would have to lose a substantial amount of weight—40 pounds—part of his original lobbying effort for the role was extensive, specific research into how, in 1984, a man dying of AIDS would see his body change. His transformation— especially in contrast to Ned and Felix’s vigorous sex scenes earlier in the movie—is a painfully, hauntingly accurate time capsule.
“I think Matt felt the ghosts,” Murphy says. “I think he felt all the shame and humiliation and degradation of all those brothers who have died of AIDS. It was a very beautiful, spiritual thing to witness.”
Filming such demanding material over the course of five months employed Bomer’s years of classical training, and it took him back to that wide-eyed 14-year-old who first read The Normal Heart. “You’re really lucky as an artist if you get a role that changes you as a person,” Bomer, now 36, says earnestly, on the brink of tears. “It taught me how to access myself on a completely different level as an artist. And it blew my mind in terms of the level of unconditional love between Ned and Felix—my goodness, if these people could incorporate this into their lives, under their circumstances, why can’t I?”

My full interview with Bomer, some adorable outtakes and more AMAZING photos will be up next week. In the meantime, as always, feel free to hit my ask box with questions/queries/exclamation points.

shananaomi:

Meet OUT’s June/July cover boy. You may also know him as Matt Bomer. You may now attempt to go about your Monday like nothing interesting has happened, but you will be so, so wrong. 

Here’s an excerpt from my cover story:

Bomer, whom Murphy had cast in guest roles on Glee (he played Darren Criss’s older brother) and The New Normal (as Andrew Rannells’s ostentatious ex-boyfriend), campaigned aggressively to play Felix. “Matt, out of everybody, fought the hardest for it,” Murphy tells Out. “It was that same passion that I had used to persuade Larry Kramer to give me the rights to the play.”

Murphy told Kramer they’d found their Felix. “I said, ‘I really believe in Matt Bomer.’ And Larry said, ‘But he’s so beautiful! Is he too beautiful?’”

Murphy arranged a meeting between the two men. “I was pretty starstruck,” Bomer says. “It was like meeting one of the Beatles. He was so central to my understanding and development. We talked for a really long time.” Kramer emailed Murphy immediately after: “He’s the one.”

Because Bomer knew the part would require a production break during which he would have to lose a substantial amount of weight—40 pounds—part of his original lobbying effort for the role was extensive, specific research into how, in 1984, a man dying of AIDS would see his body change. His transformation— especially in contrast to Ned and Felix’s vigorous sex scenes earlier in the movie—is a painfully, hauntingly accurate time capsule.

“I think Matt felt the ghosts,” Murphy says. “I think he felt all the shame and humiliation and degradation of all those brothers who have died of AIDS. It was a very beautiful, spiritual thing to witness.”

Filming such demanding material over the course of five months employed Bomer’s years of classical training, and it took him back to that wide-eyed 14-year-old who first read The Normal Heart. “You’re really lucky as an artist if you get a role that changes you as a person,” Bomer, now 36, says earnestly, on the brink of tears. “It taught me how to access myself on a completely different level as an artist. And it blew my mind in terms of the level of unconditional love between Ned and Felix—my goodness, if these people could incorporate this into their lives, under their circumstances, why can’t I?”

My full interview with Bomer, some adorable outtakes and more AMAZING photos will be up next week. In the meantime, as always, feel free to hit my ask box with questions/queries/exclamation points.

shananaomi:


The Normal Heart character poster featuring Matt Bomer via @MrRPMurphy

Ryan Murphy told me, “I was so passionate about making the movie for HBO because I wanted as many people as possible to see this story.”
With the heavy marketing HBO is putting into this, it’s hard to argue that he’d have been better off going the indie film route in limited release.
If somehow you missed it, more Matt Bomer here, and more to come from outofficial.

shananaomi:

The Normal Heart character poster featuring Matt Bomer via @MrRPMurphy

Ryan Murphy told me, “I was so passionate about making the movie for HBO because I wanted as many people as possible to see this story.”

With the heavy marketing HBO is putting into this, it’s hard to argue that he’d have been better off going the indie film route in limited release.

If somehow you missed it, more Matt Bomer here, and more to come from outofficial.


Normal Heart character poster featuring Matt Bomer via @MrRPMurphy

Normal Heart character poster featuring Matt Bomer via @MrRPMurphy

thenormalheart-movie:

Matt Bomer: The Normal Heart Changed His Life
4.21.2014
By Shana Naomi Krochmal
'It taught me how to access myself on a completely different level as an artist. And it blew my mind in terms of the level of unconditional love between Ned and Felix—my goodness, if these people could incorporate this into their lives, under their circumstances, why can’t I?'

Matt Bomer is the cover star of Out's June/July issue (available on newsstands May 15), and he spoke with writer Shana Naomi Krochmal about the experience of acting in the long-awaited adaptation of Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart  directed by Ryan Murphy for HBO. In the film, Matt Bomer plays Felix Turner, who falls victim to the disease as Ned Weeks (Mark Ruffalo) and Dr. Emma Brookner (Julia Roberts) raise hell from opposite ends to figure out what’s happening. Here we have an exclusive image from Out's photo photo shoot with Kai Z Feng and a sneak peek at the interview.



+++
Bomer, whom Murphy had cast in guest roles on Glee (he played Darren Criss’s older brother) and The New Normal (as Andrew Rannells’s ostentatious ex-boyfriend), campaigned aggressively to play Felix. “Matt, out of everybody, fought the hardest for it,” Murphy tells Out. “It was that same passion that I had used to persuade Larry Kramer to give me the rights to the play.”
Murphy told Kramer they’d found their Felix. “I said, ‘I really believe in Matt Bomer.’ And Larry said, ‘But he’s so beautiful! Is he too beautiful?’ ”
Murphy arranged a meeting between the two men. “I was pretty starstruck,” Bomer says. “It was like meeting one of the Beatles. He was so central to my understanding and development. We talked for a really long time.” Kramer emailed Murphy immediately after: “He’s the one.”
Because Bomer knew the part would require a production break during which he would have to lose a substantial amount of weight—40 pounds—part of his original lobbying effort for the role was extensive, specific research into how, in 1984, a man dying of AIDS would see his body change. His transformation— especially in contrast to Ned and Felix’s vigorous sex scenes earlier in the movie—is a painfully, hauntingly accurate time capsule.
“I think Matt felt the ghosts,” Murphy says. “I think he felt all the shame and humiliation and degradation of all those brothers who have died of AIDS. It was a very beautiful, spiritual thing to witness.”
Filming such demanding material over the course of five months employed Bomer’s years of classical training, and it took him back to that wide-eyed 14-year-old who first read The Normal Heart. “You’re really lucky as an artist if you get a role that changes you as a person,” Bomer, now 36, says earnestly, on the brink of tears. “It taught me how to access myself on a completely different level as an artist. And it blew my mind in terms of the level of unconditional love between Ned and Felix—my goodness, if these people could incorporate this into their lives, under their circumstances, why can’t I?”
Out.com

thenormalheart-movie:

Matt Bomer: The Normal Heart Changed His Life

4.21.2014

By Shana Naomi Krochmal

'It taught me how to access myself on a completely different level as an artist. And it blew my mind in terms of the level of unconditional love between Ned and Felix—my goodness, if these people could incorporate this into their lives, under their circumstances, why can’t I?'
Matt Bomer is the cover star of Out's June/July issue (available on newsstands May 15), and he spoke with writer Shana Naomi Krochmal about the experience of acting in the long-awaited adaptation of Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart  directed by Ryan Murphy for HBO. In the film, Matt Bomer plays Felix Turner, who falls victim to the disease as Ned Weeks (Mark Ruffalo) and Dr. Emma Brookner (Julia Roberts) raise hell from opposite ends to figure out what’s happening. Here we have an exclusive image from Out's photo photo shoot with Kai Z Feng and a sneak peek at the interview.

+++

Bomer, whom Murphy had cast in guest roles on Glee (he played Darren Criss’s older brother) and The New Normal (as Andrew Rannells’s ostentatious ex-boyfriend), campaigned aggressively to play Felix. “Matt, out of everybody, fought the hardest for it,” Murphy tells Out. “It was that same passion that I had used to persuade Larry Kramer to give me the rights to the play.”

Murphy told Kramer they’d found their Felix. “I said, ‘I really believe in Matt Bomer.’ And Larry said, ‘But he’s so beautiful! Is he too beautiful?’ ”

Murphy arranged a meeting between the two men. “I was pretty starstruck,” Bomer says. “It was like meeting one of the Beatles. He was so central to my understanding and development. We talked for a really long time.” Kramer emailed Murphy immediately after: “He’s the one.”

Because Bomer knew the part would require a production break during which he would have to lose a substantial amount of weight—40 pounds—part of his original lobbying effort for the role was extensive, specific research into how, in 1984, a man dying of AIDS would see his body change. His transformation— especially in contrast to Ned and Felix’s vigorous sex scenes earlier in the movie—is a painfully, hauntingly accurate time capsule.

“I think Matt felt the ghosts,” Murphy says. “I think he felt all the shame and humiliation and degradation of all those brothers who have died of AIDS. It was a very beautiful, spiritual thing to witness.”

Filming such demanding material over the course of five months employed Bomer’s years of classical training, and it took him back to that wide-eyed 14-year-old who first read The Normal Heart. “You’re really lucky as an artist if you get a role that changes you as a person,” Bomer, now 36, says earnestly, on the brink of tears. “It taught me how to access myself on a completely different level as an artist. And it blew my mind in terms of the level of unconditional love between Ned and Felix—my goodness, if these people could incorporate this into their lives, under their circumstances, why can’t I?”

Out.com

What inspired you to make the leap from acting to directing?

Well I’ve always kind of been directing stuff. I mean, like, various plays and sketch shows I was in over the years. Space Station 76 actually started as a play I came up with that was written through improvisational exercises with these incredible actors I knew. We would record these improv sessions, and then mold and rework the scenes until it told the story we wanted to tell.

A lot of “first time” directors are very neurotic about their choice of debut film, this was an interesting decision. Why this story?

I didn’t feel like I had a choice, really. I had to make this movie. It was a real passion project for me, and I was absolutely driven to make it. That’s probably the reason why, against all odds, it got made — because I wasn’t taking no for an answer from anybody. [Laughs.] People who know me, my apartment looks like a space ship from the ’70s. So not only am I nostalgic for that era…but for a future we never had. We thought we were gonna live on moon colonies and perhaps our dreams weren’t realized. So this film really explores the concept of unfulfilled dreams and the darker side of the ’70s where we were very alone in the suburbs.I suppose the reason why my producers were onboard for me to direct it was that the script had such a specific and unexpected tone.

Tell me about  this isn’t a screwball comedy poking fun at the ’70s?

Not at all. It’s definitely a dramedy. I wanted it to reflect life, which is horrible and funny and heartbreakingly hilarious at the same time. It’s more like The Ice Storm set in space. If anything it’s paying homage to the genius films I grew up with like 2001Silent Running and Logan’s Run.

Can we talk about Matt Bomer? Basically tell me everything.

Matt created this character that is so charming and sweet, but underneath it so wounded and lost. And yet, he always finds the humor and keeps his character a real person with faults and imperfections.  While his character is probably the most moral on the ship, he still has fallibility like a normal human. He’s not perfect, but you so understand what he’s going through. He captures what I saw as a kid growing up, his performance is so heart breaking but adorable.

What’s next for you?

I’m working on bringing my musical, Disaster!, to Broadway! Disaster! is a 1970s disaster movie (but a) musical. It takes place in NYC on the opening night of a floating casino/disco on the Hudson River, and every disaster from the films of that era hits these poor people on the boat (tidal wave, earthquake, inferno, killer bees, rats, sharks…) The show also features over 30 hit songs from the era, of every musical style, rock, pop and disco. I wrote it along with my dear friend, and long-time comedy partner, Seth Rudetsky, and I directed it Off-Broadway. It got the kind of reviews you dream about, which helped us attach a couple of incredible Broadway producers.

queerty

I’ve never seen or heard of anything like this. This seems to be only happening to gay men. — Dr. Emma Brookner

Men do not naturally not love. They learn not to. — Felix Turner

You can’t stop fighting for the ones you love. — Ned Weeks

The Normal Heart

fuzzykitty01:

freckledbuttchester:

I have such a weakness for characters who use snark and humor to cover up the fact that they feel like huge fuck ups but they’re actually heroes with hearts of gold and smart as all hell

image

(via dream-dweller)

Jonathan Groff in the The Normal Heart trailer

The Normal Heart: Trailer

Ned and Felix — new trailer

FAMILY

TV SHOWS

MOVIES

OTHER WORKS

OTHER